Crowd funding adventure

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I recently encouraged my friend Erin to crowd fund a motorcycle.  Her old bike died a painful death on the operating table and replacing it before snowfall was going to be a challenge. So a month and 33 backers later, she raised enough funds for this sweet Yamaha Virago 1100. 

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As part of the crowd funding benefits she promised to put our names on her bike, proof of my money well invested.

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And soon, a video of a dramatic ride from PEI to Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, will follow.

Erin is also the only hair stylist I trust with my hair cut.

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12 hrs in the Saddle

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Early morning light. Sign for a good ride.

My best riding buddy, also named Brian, and I took a rip over to Nova Scotia and back.  Probably the last big ride of this season, before snow drifts block our path.

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Packing light for the day. Snacks and water.

We took the ferry first just for the experience.  It is $40 to take the boat vs. $18 for the bridge but we save on gas and always meet interesting people.

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First in line, privelages of two wheelers.
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Ferry in the background.
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From the mess hall, good place for a greasy breakfast.

It was well worth the ride.  I am quicking discovering that Nova Scotia has the best riding in the Maritimes, if you love twisty turns and beautiful scenery.  But pack a lunch, not many places to stop along the road.

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A random wetlands park area. Even in October the mosquitos were bad.

This section of road was literally as good as the Cabot Trail.  But nowhere to stop for photo ops or places to eat.

We met a nice couple from Turro who was also named Brian and his wife Wanda.  I thought a black hole might form with that many Brians standing in the same place doing the same thing.  I have concluded that most Brians ride motorcycles and are nice guys with generous natures.  Brian Scott started a cottage business making motorcycle bags in leather.

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Brian makes custom leather bags.

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It was a great ride. Left at 8am, got home at 8pm.

Comfortably lost with a Garmin gps

There will always be times in your life when getting away means having no idea where you are heading.  I call that comfortably lost.

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It isn’t just a location but a state of being. 

In order for this to happen you need the following things:
–  the entire day blocked off with no plans with other people.
–  a full tank of gas.
–  a complete understanding of exactly how far you can travel on one tank of gas with a return plan at the halfway point.
–  a gps, only so you can find your way home without worry.
–  you phone on mute, do not disturbe, for emergencies only.
–  tell someone where you are going or install an app on your phone so a friend or worried spouse can track your progress.

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Finally, stop thinking and turn down any road that looks interesting.

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For me the ride consists of 15 minutes of anger towards traffic violators, followed by 30 minutes of worrying about things I have to get done, followed by 30 minutes of mind silence, followed by 10 minutes of realizing I was blissfully unaware of all my problems for the last 30 minutes. I then realize I might be comfortably lost, then more time passes in silence, then 1 to 3 hrs later I check my time as I notice the sun reaching the horizon, then home, relaxed and grateful I took time like this for myself (comfortably lost).

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